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How to Read Your Brokerage 1099 Tax Form





After a year of investing and trading, it’s time to report your taxable investment income to the IRS. To help you do this, your brokerage firm will send you a 1099 tax form. The form notes all your capital gains and losses, dividend and interest payments, and any other investing income made in your brokerage account. Learn how to read your 1099 tax form so you can be better prepared for filing your taxes.

If you’re a TD Ameritrade client, check out the 1099 Guide for a line-by-line breakdown:

0:00 Intro
0:51Dividends and Distributions
2:21 Miscellaneous Income
2:45 Section 1256 Contracts
3:05 Summary of Proceeds, Gains & Losses, Adjustments and Withholding
3:55 Proceeds from Broker and Barter Exchange Transactions 1099-B
4:58 Interest Income 1099-INT
5:16 Original Issue Discount and Adjustments 1099-OID
5:26 Reconciliations, Fees, Expenses and Expenditures

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36 comments

  1. How do you know what have been reported and what have not been reported on the 1099 B form to the IRS?

    Reply
  2. Can this form be accessed from the mobile app. I can't seem to find where? Please help. Thanks

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  3. What are the total proceeds? The total amount of stock value that was bought and sold for the year? I only have $3,500 in my portfolio but it says $14,000

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  4. 3:20 Where it says grand total (underneath), did that person actually generated that $374,830.14? Because mines in that section says $63,000 & I never seen that money in my portfolio

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  5. If I get dividends let's say from 3 companies should I just file one 1099-Div form? Or for each company an extra form?

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  6. i sold some shares of my fund for a small, modest gain. My 1099-B does not show cost basis and i have no record of when i originally bought them, just an estimate. The amount I sold, 10000.00 gave me $182 gain long term, do I enter that gain only, so only that gets added as extra income, not the $10000.00? BTW, reinvested dividends were issued during the term I have held those shares. How can I explain that with no record of it, only on the recent sold amount?

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  7. If you have a net loss, do you still have to report it??

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  8. What should I do after receiving this 1099 tax form???

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  9. I received a 1099 form from Cash App but the first page was all zeros. I didn't really sell a lot of stocks last year in all honesty either. I tried reporting it on H&R Block but it wouldn't let me pass the first page. Not sure what to do.

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  10. Probably a stupid question: the only transaction I conducted last year was selling my free stock from RobinHood. The gains were .27 (although technically a total of 9.86 bc it was a free stock). Am I paying taxes on that??

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  11. So since about September to now madd about $120-140 from dividends and selling stocks. This something I need to report to irs?
    For me and relatives we got a community tax gatherer that helps calculate all the files in one.

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  12. would I still need to report my stocks in my taxes if gained less than 10 dollars?

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  13. Is this an original 1099 tax form???

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  14. I was under the impression that robinhood accounts are like a roth ira "non tax deductible" since the monies i'm buying stocks with is with income that has been already taxed.

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  15. What are all the documents that i have to fill out and send to the IRS if im selling my stocks ? And in what order ?

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  16. My income tax came already

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  17. The form ETRADE gave me doesn't even look like this. So I'm thinking, I don't have taxes to pay on my investments.

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  18. Government is such a scam

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  19. What to do if your 1099 from is incorrect by robinhood?

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  20. Question, heard this but idk if it’s true. Say with my gains and my income together I made less the 40,000$ for the year. Do I still pay taxes on gains? Some where I heard you won’t have to it you make less then 40,000 a year but don’t know how true that is

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  21. so do i pay taxes on my total procedes or just netgain/loss?

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  22. Jfce d

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  23. Real helpful video!!!

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  24. is the losses same as the wash sale? 🙁 like my wash sale is like 4k while my net gain is like 900. what do I do please? Trying to file my taxes and report this

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  25. OK So i have $100 wash sale and $166 on gain.do i still report that small amount?

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  26. so crazy.they should tax as u sell.Done deal

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  27. I got one from Robinhood yesterday. Is it the same?

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  28. So you only owe taxes on your gains & losses ?

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  29. Question for anyone out there, cause I am worried and confused. My proceeds were worth 4 million (for some reason) and but I only invested a few thousand and had a net loss of a lot.

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  30. Is there any tax service that allows you fill this for free or what is the cheapest?

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  31. You can only deduct 3,000 dollars correct?? I had some major gains but towards tax season I made some stupid ass plays and ended up losing almost all of it.

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  32. Watching this makes me want to commit tax fraud

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  33. My total proceeds are 35,500. Is this how much I made ?

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  34. Can somebody just tell me which page to look at?? And which page to input the info from?

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  35. Total gains that will be taxed = Net gains (or losses) + gains from dividends and distributions [Page 1 of 1099]
    – Each individual’s tax rate will be different, but that above is the taxable gain ^
    – You can deduct max $3k per year from the total taxable amount if you had a loss in trading
    – Ignore the other pages lol. Page 1 has all that you need.
    – IRS has a PhD in how to make paperworks unreadable and incomprehensible.

    Reply
  36. Why can I only write off $3000 in losses what do I Do with the other $36000?

    Reply

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